Liberals’ Inequality Narrative Ignores Role of Free Trade, Unionbusting

by Administrator

The Occupy movement forcefully injected a long-taboo topic—America’s appalling “banana republic”-level economic disparities—into the mainstream political debate.

That inequality has immense implications, from falling wages, to deteriorating healthcare coverage, the overgrown financial sector, and the decline of America's productive base. Such sweeping inequality, deeply rooted in our economic and political system of legal payoffs and policy paybacks, has been intensifed by unionbusting and globalization.

But even many of America’s most liberal mainstream politicians and pundits have narrowed the debate over inequality, perhaps out of a desire to shield President Obama from any pressure coming from his left. The issue of tax inequities has soared in importance, exposing the privileged status enjoyed by CEOs and hedge fund and private equity executives like Mitt Romney. But other crucial dimensions of inequality painfully experienced by ordinary Americans have been crowded out.

For example, the liberal and likable Lawrence O’Donnell, host of MSNBC’s The Last Word, declares in a TV ad that all the talk about “class war” amounts to a battle over a proposed 4 percent increase in tax rates for the super-rich. Really, Lawrence?

Comments

Comment from Estelle Shumann
Time April 16, 2012 at 2:12 pm

Hello,

I came across your blog a few weeks ago as I was researching and writing my most recent series of publications, which collectively form a set of educational resources for people looking to pursue distance learning (they come together at onlineschools.org). These resources include the Education Debate (http://www.onlineschools.org/education-debate/), multiple different resources on the practicality of certain fields, and even an eBook.

Together, some of these have been referenced by the likes of the New York Times, PBS, and Mashable, among others.

I think a blog post that discusses educational reform, the current state of learning, and where it seems to all be headed into the future could be a valuable and insightful piece for your readers. If you’re interested, I would really love to work with you and come up with a guest contribution that discusses this or a similar topic that you’d enjoy. What do you think?

It would be such a pleasure to hear from you.

Cheers,

Estelle S.

Comment from Estelle Shumann
Time April 25, 2012 at 1:44 pm

Hello,

I came across your blog a few weeks ago as I was researching and writing my most recent series of publications, which collectively form a set of educational resources for people looking to pursue distance learning they come together at onlineschools.org. These resources include the Education Debate http://www.onlineschools.org/education-debate/, multiple different resources on the practicality of certain fields, and even an eBook.

Together, some of these have been referenced by the likes of the New York Times, PBS, and Mashable, among others.

I think a blog post that discusses educational reform, the current state of learning, and where it seems to all be headed into the future could be a valuable and insightful piece for your readers. If you’re interested, I would really love to work with you and come up with a guest contribution that discusses this or a similar topic that you’d enjoy. What do you think?

It would be such a pleasure to hear from you.

Cheers,

Estelle S.

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